5 Signs Your Bird is Sick


Hey guys, we’re here at Animal Wonders—home of many animals, including 34 birds. I’ve cared for well over 50 birds in my animal career and over that time I’ve learned to easily spot if a bird is sick. [light cheerful music] Bird behaviour tends to be difficult for many humans to read, partly because they don’t have any facial expression. And their bodies don’t move like us. And birds are really good at hiding any symptoms of an illness. Even if they’re feeling really terrible. And they have to be in order to hide from any predator that might want to pick a slow, injured, or sick bird out of a flock. But a combination of humans’ inability to read bird behaviour, and the bird’s ability to hide any symptoms of illness, leads to a big problem of sick birds going without medical treatment or dying from treatable ailments. So here are 5 tell tale signs that your bird might be sick. Number 1: Weight loss. The best and easiest way to tell if your bird is getting sick is to monitor their weight. Everyone who cares for a bird should own a small gram scale with a perch attached, like this. Weigh your bird first thing in the morning, after their morning poop but before they eat breakfast. This will give you the most accurate weight and once you have this weight you can weigh them daily, weekly, or monthly to monitor their health. Now there will be some fluctuation especially if your bird is still growing. But if they ever drop more then 10% of their normal morning weight, you know there’s something serious going on. Get them to a vet. Birds can be very delicate when it comes to illness. So you have to be proactive in their treatment. Make sure you have a veterinarian that’s familiar with avian health. Alright: Number 2! Watch the poo. Birds have unique droppings. Different then mammals [bird squawks] and it can take a bit to learn how to read them. But watching their droppings is a great way to tell the health of a bird. It comes in three parts. The feces, which should be cylindrical, well-formed and a consistent colour. The uric acid, which should be white or slightly yellow and chalky after it’s dry. And the excess liquid which should be clear and only slightly dampen the area around the feces and uric acid. If your birds droppings are black, bright green, or red that could be a sign of sickness. If the feces portion of the droppings is not well formed that’s considered diarrhea and your bird needs medical attention to treat the illness and prevent dehydration. Get them to a vet. Number 3! Take a breath. Watch the bird breathe. Their breaths should be consistent without any sound coming from their nostrils. If there’s a wheezing, whistling, clicking, or rasp that’s an indication of a respiratory infection and they need medical attention as soon as possible. While you’re listening watch their tail. If it’s moving up and down with each breath that’s a sign of labored breathing which is also a sign of a respiratory infection. Get them to a vet. Number 4: Pretty Bird. Birds only look pretty if they feel good on the inside. The quality of their feathers tells you a lot about their nutrition and the health of their organs. The feathers should be brightly coloured and sleek. Many birds have an oil gland that they use to shine their feathers. Other birds have a downy powder used to coat their feathers. Either way the feathers should look clean and vibrant. If their feathers look dull or drab it’s important to re-evaluate their diet and make sure they’re getting the proper amounts of nutrients. If the feathers have dark lines throughout them, that’s a sign of malnutrition and either their diet needs to be revamped or they’re not absorbing the nutrients properly. If their feather are over-groomed, plucked, or frayed at the ends that could be a sign of mental or physical distress. If their feathers show any of these symptoms. Get them to a vet. Number 5: Being Weird. If you’ve had your bird for a while and you notice a sudden change in personality it could be a sign that they aren’t feeling well. It’s important to never “wait and see” with a bird, once they start showing signs of illness it’s already quite advanced. So if you think your bird is acting weird and might be sick you know what I am going to say. Get them to a vet. The bird in your care is depending on you. So it’s a good idea to always have an emergency fund in case they need medical treatment. I hope all of you are staying healthy and happy and you never need to use any of this advice. But if you do, I hope for a speedy recovery. Thank you for watching and if you have any questions for me you can leave them in the comments below. If you want to keep learning about animals you can come on an adventure with us every week by subscribing to our YouTube channel: Animal Wonders Montana. Have a great week. And we’ll see you next time. [light cheerful music] Meet Blueberry the Northern Blue-Tongued Skink. Blueberry came to us like so many of our other animals do—from an owner who just didn’t want to care for her anymore.

100 thoughts on “5 Signs Your Bird is Sick

  1. im worried about my lovebird polly she is around 13 years old her chirp is starting to sound quiterer and she is waymore sleepier than before also she will fall asleep hen she is eating im very worried if you can plz respond

  2. Hello I have an 8 year old female white front amazon parrot named Lulu. She is wheezing for the first time I think it's due to the change of weather. I will take her to the vet. Thank you for the great advise.

  3. Nice video…
    I have an alexandrine parrot…sometimes it starts shivering…although the weather is good these days and i always keep him in a moderate temperature room….is that ok or i have to see a vet???

  4. I’m just worried bc I have never had a budgie before and cuddles is acting wierd her poop is a mix of black and white and her tongue clicks every now and again, she sleeps with her Eyes open or doesn’t sleep at all during the night and she always closes her eyes during the day, but she is happy bc she chirps and she can still fly around and eats the proper amount of the food but sometimes I have to feed her, and she also ruffles up her feathers I don’t think it is anything serious I’m just worried that she might n old sick or just doesn’t like me

  5. Wait, my parrot has had these symptoms since she was baby. She’s almost six months old and now I’m panicking. And she has a soft, kinda squishy lump on her chest. It was there once before but disappeared over night. It wasn’t there this morning but it’s there now. Someone please help me, I can’t loose my baby

  6. Please HELP. My 40+ year old RedLord Amazon is suddenly falling off his perch and when he does he sits there for a minute looking stunned or confused with his beak wide open. Its happened twice now and I'm getting really worried.

  7. I reeaaaaaaaally need to say ”calm down!” to you.. This was to much for me to handle, you speak way to fast and i can’t follow. It gives me a headache so i have to stop watching. To bad because it’s words worth spreading….

  8. I know this is an older video, but I'm in a tough spot.

    My neighbor has macaw named Tango, and Im very worried. He doesn't seem to have respiratory issues, so that's good. His droppings, however, are a bit concerning. The actual feces is fine, but his the rest is green. It isn't vibrant, and its light in color. I dont know how often she feeds him, and I dont know if he's getting what he needs. His feathers are over groomed and I know he's bored. Every time I'm over there babysitting I give him as much attention as I can, but his condition is concerning. However, she works full time and doesn't have the time to take him to the vet. Me and my family probably would, but that's overstepping our boundaries and don't have the money for it whatsoever. His personality fluctuates as well. Some days he's lovey and wants attention badly, and others he snaps at me and tries to stay out of reach. Is there anything I can do in my situation to help him?

    (She has offered for me to own him, but I know full well I won't be able to care for him properly, much less get him to a vet.)

  9. My brand new Indian RingNeck always moves his tail when he breathes but he doesn't seem sick I can't take him out of the cage because he will rip my hair and my earrings off, I tried everything on this video but not the vet yet if I see that he is gone sick I will take him to a vet

  10. Hello 🙂 I have a yellow Pacific Parrotlet and lately he has been acting really strange. I looked up signs of sickness in birds (and watched your video) and he does check off on a few of the signs of sickness. His behavior today was sitting on the bottom of the cage late at night and chirping alot. So I went up to him and took him out of his cage and spent some time with him for a bit. He just cuddled up on my shoulder and nestled himself in my hair. I put him back in his cage, and as I walked out of the room, he called to me again. He has quieted down now, but I am still concerned because he has met other sickness symptoms (like fluffled feathers, bobbing tail, sleeping through most of the day, eyes closed often, less biting, and maybe some unusual-looking droppings) This has been going on for a while now and I am really worried. Do you know what is wrong with him? Please help ASAP !! I’m really worried and my usual vetenarian for him is closed right now. Any help is very much appreciated !! Thank u for caring and for any help in advance !! 🙂

    Edit: He passed away today (the day after I initially posted this comment). My fears were not for nothing.

  11. I have a different problem, my bird sits next to the window in her cage because her friends she made are outside, but one day a Falcon came took a bird from outside ate it and now my canary is behaving weird she is very quiet and today we that she didn’t sleep at all, do we still need to take them to a vet?

  12. Hi I just wanna know if my cockatiel is blind because when I take him out of his cage for playtime he just sits on the floor and doesn't do a thing. He walks straight ahead and even hit a wall. He faces one direction all of the time, and keeps lifting hid foot forward to feel if my hand is there or not.

    Someone please help me! ( sorry for my bad english)

  13. I thing my baby figbird is sick I found her abandoned from his mum and he can not stand nor when we feed her she doesn’t chirp for food

  14. my parakeet's poops are swamp green and she's been acting grumpy ,but she act's fine other than that and i have only had her for a few month's and am wondering if i need to take her to a vet?

  15. I know this video was made in 2016 but I’m still gonna ask this:
    So my bird poops reddish brown poop sometimes so I’m wondering if it was red or brown poop. Pls answer if you’re reading this.

  16. I feel blessed that I watched this video. 2 weeks after watching this video my lovebird named Sky fell sick. I went to remove the towel from the cage and found him fluffed up with his eye closed. He didn't eat his food, was tired and didn't bother flying to his favourite perch in the house. I immediately took him to a vet and true enough his throat was inflamed and swollen. Thankfully he pulled through after weeks of medication. Thank you for going into detail about this subject. You really are Sky's life saver ^~^

  17. Thank you sweetheart from GB x
    Our new Orange Winged Amazon Parrot, aka Clover, is just so wonderful. It's night No 6 and she's learned so much but only at her speed, I remain nonchalant and just relax back to let her relax with trust whilst wandering around the room in peace. She's obviously still nervy, she's never seen a TV nor been in a bedroom but her kindness shines through beautifully, if she's happy I'm happy ?
    When she makes a deep purr sound, almost a growl, at nothing in particular other than a light shade, is it nerves or anger? I have learned not to repeat this sound but give her a mimicked reply of when she sounds happy and is greeting me. Is she okay? I wish I could upload photos, you could see our other bird in the shower with us ?
    Lots of love,
    Shellie

  18. Hello … ive got an alexsndrin chick .. i usually feed him with grain powdr nd cerials .. recntly i just change his diet nd start feeding him some fruits .. but i felt thiz evnng he was making lil noises down his throat .. is it normal ?? Please help me guyz

  19. IMPORTANT WARNING FOR PET BIRD OWNERS : The food that we normally give to the canaries (and other companion birds) consisting of a "complete, balanced and top-quality seeds mixture" bought in pet stores or malls, makes the owners trust that their pet is well fed, but it's not so: indeed the health of the pets is at imminent and serious risk.

    The owners of canaries, parrots, cockatoos, parakeets, cockatiels, etc., WE MUST PAY ATTENTION TO DOMESTIC BIRD BREEDERS AND VETS and keep in mind that although we feed them with such a typical seeds mixture, our birds are very likely in danger of suffering an unexpected, painful and practically inevitable PREMATURE DEATH BY FATTY LIVER DISEASE. Canaries, for example, will surely die at 4 – 6 years of age of the more than 14 that they can live.

    It's sad that pet birds are fated to die early and painfully in so many cases. You have to warn people to avoid it!

    This deadly disease is very common in pet birds but owners usually don’t know or detect it in time. And we can’t imagine that THE CAUSE IS IN THE FOOD ITSELF that we provide to our birds, in which such a typical mixture contains low-fat seeds such as canary seed together with other VERY fatty seeds such as niger, hemp or nabine and, in addition, the birds usually prefer to eat the fatty seeds so that their REAL DIET is unbalanced by excessive fat, gradually causes the fatty infiltration of the liver and in a few years causes fatty liver hepatitis and PREMATURE DEATH to pet birds.

    Also the breeding paste and its pigments and the sunflower seeds can attack the liver if they are taken too much or for too long.

    It's a cruel disease that progresses silently and, when its unexpected symptoms begin, they are easily confused with other ailments so the owners usually postpone the visit to the vet at a time already critical for the life of the bird (besides that not all vets are trained to recognize this elusive and misleading disease, even to administer lipotropic and regenerative liver protectors in curative doses, just in case it's that and not a supposed blow). It's a process of slow and asymptomatic progression, but when their visible symptoms begin (acute phase) the disease accelerates.

    SYMPTOMS OF THE ACUTE PHASE OF FATTY LIVER DISEASE : First, emotional decay or progressive lack of interest, hard belly (in many cases, with a dark spot with a half-moon shape on the belly, which seems a "tumor", to see it you have to wet your fingers to remove the down), falls from the sticks of the cage that seem for "errors of calculation" and then lameness (that make believe that they are by the previous falls, but both symptoms are due to that it hurts the liver), lack of flight and singing, the bird fluffs up his feathers or bends more or less slowly; Then, within a few weeks or a few days, forced breathing with open beak, remaining lying on the floor of the cage near the food, sudden spasms from time to time (which make people believe that the bird is "epileptic" but it are twinges of pain of diseased liver), abundant greenish stools (caused by biliverdin which if it's not fasting, it means hepatic harm), then black and watery (from hepatic hemorrhages), then a strange purplish color of skin and beak, an excessive appetite and the final "improvement" of a few days (in the last phase, the already degenerated liver becomes deflated by what seems to ameliorate), after which it suddenly dies among seizures (which may seem a heart infarct).

    For the first symptoms the liver has already degenerated to 80% and only an urgent (and accurate) vet action can save your bird and revert the liver situation. If you simply feed your bird with the loose seeds mixture (even if you give it fresh fruits, vegetables and let it exercise, for example by letting it out of the cage at home), right now your pet's liver is degenerating, and neither you nor your bird know. Without liver protectors, it's almost certain that your bird will die early and in many cases you won’t be able to determine its real cause .

    Hepatic lipidosis it's not only deadly by itself when the visible symptoms begin (sometimes even it does not warn at all until few moments before the death). Even before the acute phase it predisposes the bird to suffer infections, as it weakens the immune system. Obese pet birds have an higher risk of many other diseases, like arthritis, heart disease and cancer. Obesity in birds it's not so apparent but it's more dangerous than in other animals like mammals.

    So in addition to giving to the birds lipotropic and detox / regenerating hepatic protectors preventively and routinely, breeders usually make their own mixtures with low fat seeds.

    PREVENTION AND/OR TREATMENT : The time to act is NOW that your pet doesn’t have yet the visible symptoms. It's necessary to ACTIVELY PREVENT THE LIVER DEGENERATION. Fortunately it's easy to do it: It's very advisable to substitute progressively (within some weeks, as per the instructions of the manufacturer) the mixture of loose seeds for some pellets compound food of seeds, fruits and vegetables (preferably those that already include liver protectors), because this prevents the bird from filtering and eating mostly the fatty seeds (but without insisting if the bird does not get accustomed to eating pellets because he could die for starvation within a few days) .

    And, whatever the diet, it's CRUCIAL to add to the drinking water or to the food a LIPOTROPIC LIVER PROTECTOR that includes carnitine and / or choline, betaine, methionine, etc., (and it's very convenient to add a DETOX / REGENERATING LIVER PROTECTOR with thistle milk, boldo, artichoke extract) . Liver protectors are not medicine but cheap food supplements manufactured by pet bird vet laboratories that remove the fat from the liver, clean it and favor its recovery. It's essential to add them to the pet birds diet to conserve their liver. It's something that professionals as breeders and vets know, but we the owners usually don't know.

    It are appearing in the market compound feed for pet birds that don’t include fatty seeds and that already include several liver protectors. But the vast majority of owners still confidently feed their birds with the typical mixture of loose seeds with little fat and other very fatty seeds… And their birds continue dying of hepatic lipidosis in a large number of cases (likely, in most cases) . Now we know that, as fatty liver disease develops from the daily food itself, it’s most likely THE FIRST CAUSE OF DEATH OF PET BIRDS, and more so as the bird ages.

    Webs on FLD:

    https://www.beautyofbirds.com/liverdisease.html
    Liver disease is a slow, on-going progressive disease where the liver tissue is replaced with fat. When the liver disease has progressed, the bird may suddenly appear ill.

    https://www.lovinghands.com/forms/Hepatic%20Lipidosis%20-%20Fatty%20Liver%20Disease.pdf
    One of the sadder diseases many avian vets see is that of hepatic lipidosis or fatty liver disease. It's sad in a number of ways since often the birds are very ill, life-threateningly so, or possibly having died suddenly. Often the owners have been unaware of the dangers of feeding their beloved pet the seeds, peanuts, or other fatty foods the bird obviously loves to eat. These are truly cases of "loving your bird to death". Any bird can fall victim to fatty liver disease.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/46105643_Treating_liver_disease_in_the_avian_patient
    Dietary deficiencies of lipotrophic factors such as choline, biotin, and methionine may decrease the transport of lipids from the liver.

    http://www.veterinaria.org/revistas/redvet/n111110B/111004B.pdf The clinical manifestations of hepatic diseases in ornamental birds are much more frequent than people could imagine and in many cases they are not appreciated, progress in a silent way and when they are evident, vet action may (usually) arrive late.

    Most any avian symptomatology should be considered as if it were a pathology that could be serious, and not allow the disease to develop because then it will probably be too late. We must closely investigate the symptoms, take preventive measures that don’t harm (such as giving liver and intestinal protectors according to the leaflet) ask for advice from vets, breeders, etc. and procure the most appropriate treatment RAPIDLY, but without rushing in the treatment or with the doses in such small animals. If the days go by and the bird doesn’t improve, it's necessary to continue investigating and, if necessary, change the medication in an informed and contrasted manner. Doing nothing or stopping research usually ends up with the bird dead, but acting without being sure of what is done and in what dose, it likely ends the same way. It's necessary to obtain and confirm the sufficient vet experience and have the serenity to determine in each case whether it's convenient to hasten to do and / or administer what medicine and in what dose, or if it’s better not to do and let the situation evolve without medicating for the time being, or according to the medication that has already been administered.

    A limp in a bird is not always an injury caused by a blow, but the symptom of a disease of some organ (usually the liver or an intestinal disease) that needs to be discovered and treated ASAP. When in doubt, change diet to one with the lowest fat possible (only birdseed, or with other low-fat seeds such as millet, chia, fresh fruits and vegetables) and administer lipotropic and regenerating liver protectors in curative doses immediately… although nothing could foresee a fatal outcome. There are also food supplements protectors of the intestinal mucosa and stimulants of the immune system. In doses according to the leaflets do not cause damage, it will surely save the life of your bird (if it's not too late), and will keep them with a basic wellness.

  20. My cockatiel is not being active,cannot bite ,properly it shivers,shakes it's head every minute,eats it's poop .

  21. i just bought my bird yesterday and i dont really know much about birds, my bird is always making sounds and shes just 1 month old

  22. Hello Mam i have two parrots …they started flying now …they look well but they're not eating well ….even they are not speaking much…what to do?

  23. Hello! My son just bought a parrot, a day ago, and he's not eating, its just a 'baby' and we're feeding thru a syringe and hes not eating(?)

  24. jessi my cockatiel has yellow and black poo. is that normal for cockatiels or is it a sign he is sick please respknd soon

  25. I’m really scared my parrot is acting wierd she’s started to be sleepy and how to say really … quiet ??I will take her to the vet

  26. More pet owners/breeders/sellers should emphasize on putting away some pet funds just in case one gets sick cause you could definetly get blindsided with all the bills if your not ready for it

  27. My budgie used to be so sweet and ride on my shoulder and never fly away from me, and now, whenever I take him out he screams and tries to fly away! Is this normal? And will he go back to normal?

  28. hi there, I have rescued a baby greckle from neighborhood cats… it does not open its beak. What's a good procedure. I have a make shift pearch made for it on my front window. please help!!!!!

  29. I need help. So my bird has these white things (I think they’re feathers that he just needs to take them out) and they won’t go away. My parents got a bird when I was about 4 and we’ve had him since. I don’t really thing they knew what they were doing, but they just don’t go away. Little dexter is about 8+ and he’s been like that for a while.

  30. My female cockatiel was putting her wings out and flattening her back when we got my male I REALIZED SHE WANTED TO MATE. first time I saw it happen I was like NOT AT MY FEEEEEEET!

  31. IMPORTANT WARNING FOR PET BIRD OWNERS: The food that we normally give to the canaries (and other companion birds) consisting of a "complete, balanced and top-quality seeds mixture" bought in pet stores or malls, makes the owners trust that their pet is well fed, but it's not so: indeed the birds health is at serious risk.

    The owners of canaries, parrots, cockatoos, budgies, cockatiels, etc., WE MUST PAY ATTENTION TO DOMESTIC BIRD BREEDERS AND VETS and keep in mind that although we feed them with such a typical seeds mixture, our birds are very likely in danger of suffering an unexpected, painful and practically inevitable PREMATURE DEATH BY FATTY LIVER DISEASE. Canaries, for example, will surely die at 4 – 7 years of age of the more than 14 that they can live.

    It's sad that pet birds are fated to die early and painfully in so many cases. You have to warn people to avoid it!

    This deadly disease is very common in pet birds but owners usually don’t know or detect it in time. And we can’t imagine that THE CAUSE IS IN THE FOOD ITSELF that we provide to our birds, in which such a typical mixture contains low-fat seeds such as canary seed together with other VERY fatty seeds such as niger, hemp or nabine and, in addition, the birds usually prefer to eat the fatty seeds so that their REAL DIET is unbalanced by excessive fat, gradually causes the fatty infiltration of the liver and in a few years causes fatty liver hepatitis and PREMATURE DEATH to pet birds.

    Also the fruits and specially the breeding paste and its pigments and the sunflower seeds can attack the liver if they are taken too much or for too long.

    It's a cruel disease that progresses silently and, when its unexpected symptoms begin, they are easily confused with other ailments so the owners usually postpone the visit to the vet at a time already critical for the life of the bird (besides that not all vets are trained to recognize this elusive and misleading disease, even to administer lipotropic and regenerative liver protectors in curative doses, just in case it's that and not a supposed blow). It's a process of slow and asymptomatic progression, but when their visible symptoms begin (acute phase) the disease accelerates.

    SYMPTOMS OF THE ACUTE PHASE OF FATTY LIVER DISEASE: First, progressive sadness and/or pecking, hard belly (in many cases, with a dark spot with a half-moon shape on the belly, which seems a "tumor", to see it you have to wet your fingers to remove the down), falls from the sticks of the cage that seem for "errors of calculation" and then lameness (that make believe that they are by the previous falls, but both symptoms are due to that it hurts the liver), lack of flight and singing, the bird fluffs up his feathers or bends more or less slowly; Then, within a few weeks or a few days, heavy breathing with open beak, remaining lying on the floor of the cage near the food, sudden spasms from time to time (which make people believe that the bird is "epileptic" but it are twinges of pain of diseased liver), abundant greenish poop (caused by biliverdin which if it's not fasting, it means hepatic harm), then black and watery (from hepatic hemorrhages), then a strange purplish color of skin and beak, an excessive appetite and the final "improvement" of a few days (in the last phase, the already degenerated liver becomes deflated by what the bird seems to ameliorate), after which it suddenly dies among seizures (which may seem a heart infarct).

    For the first symptoms the liver has already degenerated to 80% and only an urgent (and accurate) vet action can save your bird and revert the liver situation. If you simply feed your bird with the loose seeds mixture (even if you give it fresh fruits, vegetables and let it exercise, for example by letting it out of the cage at home), right now your pet's liver is degenerating, and neither you nor your bird know. Without liver protectors, it's almost certain that your bird will die early and in many cases you won’t be able to determine its real cause.

    Hepatic lipidosis it's not only deadly by itself when the visible symptoms begin (sometimes even it does not warn at all until few moments before the death). Even before the acute phase it predisposes the bird to suffer infections, as it weakens the immune system. Obese pet birds have an higher risk of many other diseases, like arthritis, heart disease and cancer. Obesity in birds it's not so apparent but it's more dangerous than in other animals like mammals.

    So in addition to giving to the birds lipotropic and detox / regenerating hepatic protectors preventively and routinely, breeders usually make their own mixtures with low fat seeds.

    PREVENTION AND/OR TREATMENT: The time to act is NOW that your bird doesn’t have yet the visible symptoms. It's necessary to ACTIVELY PREVENT THE LIVER DEGENERATION. Fortunately it's easy to do it: It's very advisable to substitute progressively (within some weeks, as per the instructions of the manufacturer) the mixture of loose seeds for some pellets compound food of seeds, fruits and vegetables (preferably those that already include liver protectors), because this prevents the bird from filtering and eating mostly the fatty seeds (but without insisting if the bird does not get accustomed to eating pellets because he could die for starvation within a few days).

    And, whatever the diet, it's CRUCIAL to add to the drinking water or to the food a LIPOTROPIC LIVER PROTECTOR that includes carnitine and / or choline, betaine, methionine, etc., (and it's very convenient to add a DETOX / REGENERATING LIVER PROTECTOR with thistle milk, boldo, artichoke extract).

    Liver protectors are not medicine but cheap food supplements manufactured by pet bird vet laboratories that remove the fat from the liver, clean it and favor its recovery. It's essential to add them to the pet birds diet to conserve their liver. It's something that breeders and vets know, but we the owners usually don't know.

    It are appearing in the market compound feed for pet birds that don’t include fatty seeds and that already include several liver protectors. But the vast majority of owners still confidently feed their birds with the typical mixture of loose seeds with little fat and other very fatty seeds… And their birds continue dying for hepatic lipidosis in a large number of cases (likely, in most cases). Now we know that, as fatty liver disease develops from the daily food itself, it’s most likely THE FIRST CAUSE OF DEATH OF PET BIRDS, and more so as the bird ages.

    Webs on FLD:

    https://www.beautyofbirds.com/liverdisease.html
    Liver disease is a slow, on-going progressive disease where the liver tissue is replaced with fat. When the liver disease has progressed, the bird may suddenly appear ill.

    https://www.lovinghands.com/forms/Hepatic%20Lipidosis%20-%20Fatty%20Liver%20Disease.pdf One of the sadder diseases many avian vets see is that of hepatic lipidosis or fatty liver disease. It's sad in a number of ways since often the birds are very ill, life-threateningly so, or possibly having died suddenly. Often the owners have been unaware of the dangers of feeding their beloved pet the seeds, peanuts, or other fatty foods the bird obviously loves to eat. These are truly cases of "loving your bird to death". Any bird can fall victim to fatty liver disease.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/46105643_Treating_liver_disease_in_the_avian_patient Dietary deficiencies of lipotrophic factors such as choline, biotin, and methionine may decrease the transport of lipids from the liver.

    http://www.veterinaria.org/revistas/redvet/n111110B/111004B.pdf The clinical manifestations of hepatic diseases in ornamental birds are much more frequent than people could imagine and in many cases they are not appreciated, progress in a silent way and when they are evident, vet action may arrive late.

    Most any avian symptomatology should be considered as if it was a pathology that could be serious, and not allow the disease to develop because then it will probably be too late. We must closely investigate the symptoms, take preventive measures that don’t harm (such as giving liver and intestinal protectors according to the leaflet) ask for advice from vets, breeders, etc. and procure the most appropriate treatment RAPIDLY, but without rushing in the treatment or with the doses in such small animals. If the days go by and the bird doesn’t improve, it's necessary to continue investigating and, if necessary, change the medication in an informed and contrasted manner. Doing nothing or stopping research usually ends up with the bird dead, but acting without being sure of what is done and in what dose, it likely ends the same way. It's necessary to obtain and confirm the sufficient vet experience and have the serenity to determine in each case whether it's convenient to hasten to do and / or administer what medicine and in what dose, or if it’s better not to do and let the situation evolve without medicating for the time being, or according to the medication that has already been administered.

    A limp in a bird is not always an injury caused by a blow, but the symptom of a disease of some organ (usually the liver or an intestinal disease) that needs to be discovered and treated ASAP. When in doubt, change diet to one with the lowest fat possible (only birdseed, or with other low-fat seeds such as millet, chia and vegetables) and administer lipotropic and regenerating liver protectors in curative doses immediately… although nothing could foresee a fatal outcome. There are also food supplements protectors of the intestinal mucosa and stimulants of the immune system. In doses according to the leaflets do not cause damage, it will surely save the life of your bird (if it's not too late), and will keep them with a basic wellness.

  32. My bird is acting normal. But when shes chilling or preening herself she crys. And moves her right wing and crys. She flies around normal but crys as shes flapping. I look at her wings and they look normal. I dont see any messed up blood feathers. Idk what could be wrong
    Also there's is no vet willing to see my bird. They dont special in birds. The nearest vet that would see her is about 3 citys away and that's a 2 hour drive there. Idk if I should risk the stress.

  33. My baby dove died, he was pooping watery green. He didn’t wanted to eat yesterday, but I hand fed him mourning and afternoon. I found him on my grass, so I took care of him. He started to poop green two days ago, I thought it was the baby formula I was giving him. I woke up to see if he was okay this morning and he was dead. I feel upset with my self, I wish I knew more about birds and was more cautious when I found him. :,(

  34. I wonder if Ecuador's "squeak" is right on cue, that's some perfect timing right there!

    PS: Darn, that's a fast but effective way to squeeze useful information into someone's head. First video I watch on the channel, and I'm definitely going to watch more!

  35. Very informative and I love your show. No avian vet in Jakarta , I have a budgie, lovebird and a new member cockatiel. How do I cure my cockatiel from diarrhea?

  36. Jessie or anybody in the comments, this is very urgent, my conure has lost a lot of weight, it’s stools have turned black, bobs her head and has fluffed feathers.

    Am taking her to a vet but I wanted to know any good solutions to increase her weight and what I should do if she’s having trouble breathing.

    Please help, I really do fear like there isn’t much time left.

  37. Ok so I think my bird might be sick! I recently got him from a breeder so he has come in contact with other birds (he is a cockatiel). He has this reddish black discharge (not much at all) in his nose, I’m saying in because it’s not coming out of his nose. He also has this yellow stuff that I can’t get off around his eye. Pls help

  38. I had a green cheek conure before and he was less than one year old when he died. It was one afternoon when I was sitting on the couch while Charlie (it's name) started screaming at the bottom of the cage, his head was tilted back all the way but then died in 10 seconds. He had good diet and didn't show any signs of illness. Do you think you know what happened?

    Also we got another bird after, but sometimes it's poop is red and white, but isn't that just part of some food they eat, because it happens sometimes with my bird now but then goes away?

  39. my parrot is not eating as it usually eats and it is also not taking and also shivering what can I do for it .plzzz help me

  40. I bought a cockatiel from bazaar u wanted to rescue it but when we got home it died of sickness i remembered his last day meeting my parrot then goodbye.

    This is real but if you think this is fake, its your opinion.

  41. Umm so my cockatiel is 5 months old I got him 2 days ago.
    He hasn't eaten or drank (maybe) anything that I have seen yet and his poo is greenish
    But he breathes normally.
    Please tell me is something wrong with him? He is still moving around he tries to fly but the people I bought him from clipped his wings so he cannot fly, but he still climbs the cage wall back up. He has chirped a few times and sneezed about 2 or 3 times since I have had him. Is he okay? Please respond quickly I NEED to know!!
    Edit: also his tail shakes but not really back and forth it is just shaking/trembling like the rest of him, but it is always around 70-80 degrees in my bed room??
    Edit edit: he also keeps fluffing up his feathers and preening under the wings
    edit edit edit: but I tried to look it up and he isn't crouching low on the perch and his eyes are squinting but yesterday he was closing his eyes a lot just for a second tho (not like a blink tho) i just assumed he was tired and didn't get much sleep since he is not used to his home.

  42. Hi, how can I tell the difference between a bird that is molting and a bird that is sick? My bird just started sleeping and eating a lot all of a sudden.

  43. Another bad sign is loss of appetite.

    And regarding the poop, red pepper can color it red. So if your bird had some earlier that day it can result in red stool.

    Can be good to know, I freaked out the first time this happened to my baby.

  44. My rescue Monk parrot was missing feathers when he came to me..he is my sweetheart. He has a beautiful tail and his wings are better now .My concern is this, I spend 2 hours a day kissing .singing, and talking to him for the last 5 years…he comprehends well and will do what I ask..but never talks. I have changed his diet to pellets,see fruit nuts . I eat with him…he still has no feathers under his wings ! His chest grey down. I bought him a rope toy which is helping with the plucking. The feathers he has are shiny and smooth.. this is breaking my heart..pplease help

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